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Candy Flavored Methamphetamine
The New Trend to get kids hooked!
“By Donna Leinwand, USA TODAY
Reports of candy-flavored methamphetamine are emerging around the
nation, stirring concern among police and abuse prevention experts that drug
dealers are marketing the drug to younger people.
The flavored crystals are available in California, Nevada, Washington, Idaho,
Texas, New Mexico, Missouri and Minnesota, according to intelligence
gathered by Drug Enforcement Administration agents from informants, users,
local police and drug counselors, DEA spokesman Steve Robertson says.

ON DEADLINE: 'Strawberry quick' popular with snorters

"Drug traffickers are trying to lure in new customers, no matter what their age,
by making the meth seem less dangerous," Robertson says.

Methamphetamine, a highly addictive stimulant, is usually a white or
brownish, bitter-tasting crystalline powder that dissolves in water. It is usually
smoked or snorted.

Strawberry quick: The new & improved form of meth?
To combat the bitter taste of methamphetamines, police say some cooks are
adding flavoring that gives the drug a strawberry flavor and turns its
trademark crystals bright pink.

"To entice children around Valentine’s Day, manufacturers and dealers
compressed the flavored form of the drug into heart shapes, colored it bright
pink and wrapped it in shiny paper," the Idaho Press-Tribune reported earlier
this month. "Just like regular meth, the 'quick' versions can be broken up into
a powder and snorted with a drinking straw, can be smoked or can be
reliquified and injected intravenously."

Here's what a recent law-enforcement bulletin said: "Strawberry Quick is
popular among new users who snort it because the flavoring can cut down
on the taste. Teenagers who have been taught meth is bad may see this
flavored version as less harmful. 'Strawberry Quick' is designed for the
younger crowd."

(We're going to go out on a limb and state with certainty that this illegal drug
has nothing to do with the tasty drinks that Nesquik markets under a similar
trademark.)

Here's a recent video report on flavored meth. And here's a contradictory
report that says it's all a myth. The warning's being sounded as far away as
Australia.

"(We are) concerned that this new type of meth will be more attractive to a
younger crowd and may surface in schools," the commander of the Carson
City Sheriff's Department's Special Enforcement Team told the Nevada
Appeal. "Parents and teachers, please be aware of this new kind of drug that
is making its way into our culture."TMZ, the gossip site, warns that colored
cocaine is all the rage with young and restless Hollywood types.
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Arkansas Police Say Dealers Using Strawberry Quick-Flavored
Methamphetamine to Hook New Users.
LITTLE ROCK, Ark.  —

Arkansas police officers had seen leftover methamphetamine ingredients just
like the mess they found in a suspected cook's trash can last month. What
gave them pause this time were the packets of strawberry-flavored children's
drink mix next to the bin.

It was among the officers' first encounters with "Strawberry Quick," the latest
version of methamphetamine, a drug authorities say manufacturers are
constantly remaking to keep their customer base growing.

From lollipops to high-sugar sodas, law enforcement officials say they've
found meth cut with a variety of candies, drinks and other materials over the
years. Officials say the "designer meth" can smooth the ingestion of the
drug, making it easier for first-time users to try.

"It's really a bitter substance ... so if you're going to try to make it more
consumable for the masses, then you're going to want to try to take that
edge off whichever way you can," said Chris Harrison, chief illicit laboratory
chemist at the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory.

"Strawberry Quick" came to prominence in January, after the Nevada
Department of Public Safety issued a bulletin describing the type of meth
there, said Steve Robertson, a Washington-based spokesman for the Drug
Enforcement Administration. DEA agents have since heard reports of
flavored meth appearing in Missouri, Texas, Washington state and Wisconsin
— though Robertson stressed it was not a nationwide phenomenon.

"Traffickers are out there and are trying to sell it to customers, whether they
are young customers or older, brand-new customers by changing the color
or the taste or just giving it a less-intimidating name, they are trying to make it
seem less dangerous and lure this new customer base," Robertson said. "If
someone was completely terrified of trying it, it might diminish the threat."

"Strawberry Quick" uses powdered drink mix to give the drug a pink
coloring. The sweetness of the powder can make meth more palatable and
partially masks its harsh chemical taste.

Cutting the meth also may soften the burning sensation some have when
snorting the powdered drug, Harrison said.

"It's a different spin, like a marketing thing," said William Bryant, assistant
special agent in charge of the DEA's office in Little Rock.

Methamphetamine is found in powder and in a crystallized form similar to
broken glass. Its low boiling point allows for it to be smoked or injected
easily.

Because of its chemical properties, meth easily mixes into any water-based
liquid. Caffeinated, high-sugar energy drinks and sodas often litter areas
where meth cookers manufacture the drug, sometimes used as a chaser to
the stimulant, Harrison said.

Arkansas police officers had seen leftover methamphetamine ingredients just
like the mess they found in a suspected cook's trash can last month. What
gave them pause this time were the packets of strawberry-flavored children's
drink mix next to the bin. It was among the officers' first encounters with
"Strawberry Quick," the latest version of methamphetamine, a drug authorities
say manufacturers are constantly remaking to keep their customer base
growing.

From lollipops to high-sugar sodas, law enforcement officials say they've
found...